Behind/Bmrng

Democratising Design - www.Bamarang.co.uk
With April well and truly living up to its wet reputation, we felt it was only fair to let our Design Scouts make a trip to Milan for the inspiring Salone Internazionale del Mobile. This year the festival felt more international than ever before, showing that not even a global recession can restrain great design, despite the weather being just as bad in Milan.
While half of the team worked away in Shoreditch, drenched by the April Monsoon, Gui, Sam and Maider were equally wet but in design heaven. Feasting on a visual banquet, it was the bright young designers that really caught their eye. We chatted with Sam on his return, who told us about his pick of the top talent at Milan Design Week.

1. I found a favourite in Dutch brand Usuals, their “Me and My Beretta” handbag really struck me. It’s the perfect accessory for any urban warrior - the girl who’s in no mood to be harassed at the club.
2. The student projects located the Lambrate district were incredibly strong this year, and one of our favourites created a conceptual masterpiece confronting the issue of privacy in urban environments. The Own Zown promotes personal privacy by literally creating it - perhaps we should consider getting some of these in for the open plan Bamarang HQ?

3. Much product design is becoming increasingly thoughtful in its concept, often seeking to find harmony between the organic and the manmade. Transnatural Designs expertly fuses nature and technology to create pieces that are beautiful, practical, and impressive.
4. The UK was represented in fine form by Tom Dixon and his championing of the hottest international design talent at his group exhibition, MOST, at the Museo della Scienza e della Tecnologia. His new homeward range “Eclectic”, whilst being extremely covetable, was displayed in a setting more akin to an art gallery than a design fair. 

5. I was impressed by Thorne, Wallenberg and Weller’s project for the RCA Paradise exhibition. The team were minting coins live throughout the day in an attempt to raise debate around consumption and exchange, it was incredible to watch. This is Sam Weller, one of the talented men who made it all happen. Not only do this trio design as a collective, but they also create individually - certainly one’s to watch when they graduate this year. 
6. Molo designs cleverly transformed the length of a piazza with their modular spatial designs and cloud-like hanging mobiles. I hope these Canadians come to London soon, as their work is fresh and exciting.

On their return from Milan, our design scouts flooded our inbox with photos from across the events (see above!) and began compiling their shortlist of the many bright sparks to support on Bamarang. Hopefully you’ll be seeing more from these guys on Bamarang soon!

With April well and truly living up to its wet reputation, we felt it was only fair to let our Design Scouts make a trip to Milan for the inspiring Salone Internazionale del Mobile. This year the festival felt more international than ever before, showing that not even a global recession can restrain great design, despite the weather being just as bad in Milan.

While half of the team worked away in Shoreditch, drenched by the April Monsoon, Gui, Sam and Maider were equally wet but in design heaven. Feasting on a visual banquet, it was the bright young designers that really caught their eye. We chatted with Sam on his return, who told us about his pick of the top talent at Milan Design Week.

1. I found a favourite in Dutch brand Usuals, their “Me and My Beretta” handbag really struck me. It’s the perfect accessory for any urban warrior - the girl who’s in no mood to be harassed at the club.

2. The student projects located the Lambrate district were incredibly strong this year, and one of our favourites created a conceptual masterpiece confronting the issue of privacy in urban environments. The Own Zown promotes personal privacy by literally creating it - perhaps we should consider getting some of these in for the open plan Bamarang HQ?

3. Much product design is becoming increasingly thoughtful in its concept, often seeking to find harmony between the organic and the manmade. Transnatural Designs expertly fuses nature and technology to create pieces that are beautiful, practical, and impressive.

4. The UK was represented in fine form by Tom Dixon and his championing of the hottest international design talent at his group exhibition, MOST, at the Museo della Scienza e della Tecnologia. His new homeward range “Eclectic”, whilst being extremely covetable, was displayed in a setting more akin to an art gallery than a design fair. 

5. I was impressed by Thorne, Wallenberg and Weller’s project for the RCA Paradise exhibition. The team were minting coins live throughout the day in an attempt to raise debate around consumption and exchange, it was incredible to watch. This is Sam Weller, one of the talented men who made it all happen. Not only do this trio design as a collective, but they also create individually - certainly one’s to watch when they graduate this year. 

6. Molo designs cleverly transformed the length of a piazza with their modular spatial designs and cloud-like hanging mobiles. I hope these Canadians come to London soon, as their work is fresh and exciting.

On their return from Milan, our design scouts flooded our inbox with photos from across the events (see above!) and began compiling their shortlist of the many bright sparks to support on Bamarang. Hopefully you’ll be seeing more from these guys on Bamarang soon!

Andrew Myers is all over our radar. Experimenting with depth and alternative materials, the artist is transfixed with creating huge 3D portraits from screws. Based in California, the artist’s awesome creative process is meticulous yet spontaneous, as he works completely without digital aids. Born out of a love for advanced figurative sculpture and technical painting, the artist drills screws into ply board using alternating depths to recreate the 3D lines of a face. The results are astonishing, mesmeric and totally unique.

Born in Germany and raised in Spain, Myers’ early exposure to European art and culture was crystallized in the classical style of his primary works. At the age of 20, the artist went on to become a student at the prolific Laguna College of Art and Design. Accepted on the strength of his portfolio alone, this was Myers’ first insight into any kind of creative training, and the budding artist soon developed skills in advanced figurative sculpture and technical painting. Once graduated, the artist combined his skills with a love of modern material and the screw series shortly followed. To see Andrew in action, check out this amazing short directed by filmmaker Benjamin Pitts. 

Andrew Myers is all over our radar. Experimenting with depth and alternative materials, the artist is transfixed with creating huge 3D portraits from screws. Based in California, the artist’s awesome creative process is meticulous yet spontaneous, as he works completely without digital aids. Born out of a love for advanced figurative sculpture and technical painting, the artist drills screws into ply board using alternating depths to recreate the 3D lines of a face. The results are astonishing, mesmeric and totally unique.

Born in Germany and raised in Spain, Myers’ early exposure to European art and culture was crystallized in the classical style of his primary works. At the age of 20, the artist went on to become a student at the prolific Laguna College of Art and Design. Accepted on the strength of his portfolio alone, this was Myers’ first insight into any kind of creative training, and the budding artist soon developed skills in advanced figurative sculpture and technical painting. Once graduated, the artist combined his skills with a love of modern material and the screw series shortly followed. To see Andrew in action, check out this amazing short directed by filmmaker Benjamin Pitts. 

Born and bred in London, Doghouse is the monochromatic subversive label turning fashion branding on it’s head. Founded by Manjit Sangha who works with a close knit team work on all events of the brand - photography, design and promotion with powerful effect. Doghouse started with the premise that style shouldn’t be reserved for only those who are “5ft 10, size 0 and have memorized all the latest catwalk trends” - this is truly democratisation for the digital age. 
Manjit always knew he wanted to follow a creative career path. Passing hours of his time as a child drawing, it was at school that his artistic mind opened, studying everything from interior design to fine art. “I found my real passion lay in graphic design combining elements of fashion so specialized in this field at London College Of Fashion”, says Manjit. It was after working for a number of other designers that he decided to launch a brand of his own.
Despite being the builder of his own business, he’s still a creative soul - constantly hand drawing and scribbling down ideas. We got time to sit down with the man himself to figure out what makes him tick – from dog wrestling to throwing recessionary parties.
What does good design mean to you?
“When the user really enjoys using and wearing your stuff.”
What does your average day look like?
“I don’t think I have an average day! One day I might be running around handing out press loans, another day selling at a DOGHOUSE pop up shop or campaigning on the streets of London. When you run your own creative business, you really do run the whole show and everyday is different.”
How do you like to spend your free time?
“Im a big movie fan, anything from the 80’s or trashy horror B- movies. Classics! Music and art are also important to me as well as having a laugh with my crazy friends (aka The Dogettes!). Keeping fit is so in these days. But I don’t do gyms. Wrestling with with my german shepherd dog does the trick.”
What would you say is your biggest achievement to date?
“Well Im really proud of how far the brand has come in the space of 3 years. We’ve got a growing fan base and received some great press. A special noted achievement was being recognised by one of the biggest names in fashion world, who imposed a big fat ban on one of our tees!”
What do your customers respond best to?
“Slickness without seriousness. We project power without attitude.”
What place in the world inspires you most and why?
“LONDON! There’s no where like it. The London fashion scene really is the most innovative and creative. It’s a place thats always changing. Whether it be the street art in East London or a one off art event in Central.”
Fast Five Faves
Favourite Artist: Egon Schiele
Favourite Food: Ice Cream
Favourite Album: Oooh too many! Probably Madonna’s First Album!
Favourite City: London
Favourite Book: Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
With a ‘Free Fashion’ campaign on the horizon as well as Doghouse’s recession party, the future is truly bright for this London style pioneer. Of course, at Bamarang we’re all about bringing design to the people so the partnership with Doghouse simply made sense. Their range of black and white totes are bold, brave and most definitely London. Check out the range on Bamarang here.

Born and bred in London, Doghouse is the monochromatic subversive label turning fashion branding on it’s head. Founded by Manjit Sangha who works with a close knit team work on all events of the brand - photography, design and promotion with powerful effect. Doghouse started with the premise that style shouldn’t be reserved for only those who are “5ft 10, size 0 and have memorized all the latest catwalk trends” - this is truly democratisation for the digital age.

Manjit always knew he wanted to follow a creative career path. Passing hours of his time as a child drawing, it was at school that his artistic mind opened, studying everything from interior design to fine art. “I found my real passion lay in graphic design combining elements of fashion so specialized in this field at London College Of Fashion”, says Manjit. It was after working for a number of other designers that he decided to launch a brand of his own.

Despite being the builder of his own business, he’s still a creative soul - constantly hand drawing and scribbling down ideas. We got time to sit down with the man himself to figure out what makes him tick – from dog wrestling to throwing recessionary parties.

What does good design mean to you?

“When the user really enjoys using and wearing your stuff.”

What does your average day look like?

“I don’t think I have an average day! One day I might be running around handing out press loans, another day selling at a DOGHOUSE pop up shop or campaigning on the streets of London. When you run your own creative business, you really do run the whole show and everyday is different.”

How do you like to spend your free time?

“Im a big movie fan, anything from the 80’s or trashy horror B- movies. Classics! Music and art are also important to me as well as having a laugh with my crazy friends (aka The Dogettes!). Keeping fit is so in these days. But I don’t do gyms. Wrestling with with my german shepherd dog does the trick.”

What would you say is your biggest achievement to date?

“Well Im really proud of how far the brand has come in the space of 3 years. We’ve got a growing fan base and received some great press. A special noted achievement was being recognised by one of the biggest names in fashion world, who imposed a big fat ban on one of our tees!”

What do your customers respond best to?

“Slickness without seriousness. We project power without attitude.”

What place in the world inspires you most and why?

“LONDON! There’s no where like it. The London fashion scene really is the most innovative and creative. It’s a place thats always changing. Whether it be the street art in East London or a one off art event in Central.”

Fast Five Faves

Favourite Artist: Egon Schiele

Favourite Food: Ice Cream

Favourite Album: Oooh too many! Probably Madonna’s First Album!

Favourite City: London

Favourite Book: Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

With a ‘Free Fashion’ campaign on the horizon as well as Doghouse’s recession party, the future is truly bright for this London style pioneer. Of course, at Bamarang we’re all about bringing design to the people so the partnership with Doghouse simply made sense. Their range of black and white totes are bold, brave and most definitely London. Check out the range on Bamarang here.

This week I visited ceramic artist Makiko Nakamura in her new studio at Clerkenwell. Coming from Japan and studying in London, her perspective is truly unique, so much so that she was hand picked to work alongside Sarah Burton on the Fall 2011 campaign for Alexander McQueen. We sat down on a drizzly English afternoon to talk about her career, being Japanese and of course, what it’s like working with Alexander McQueen.




On career:
I knew from a young age that I wanted to work in art. My grandmother gave me painting crayons when I was 3 and I’ve been expressing myself visually ever since. Then when I was 9 or 10 years old in primary school I remember picking up a plate. I thought ‘This is it!’ From that moment on I knew I wanted to work in ceramics. There’s no explanation for it, I just had a feeling.
On being Japanese in London:
To me, London is the main source of the inspiration for my collection. It’s the best city in the world for me. I’ve never been surrounded by such a group of talented, creative people. Old and new exist together in London – I can go to a great antique shop in the West and in the same day for drinks with my friends in the East, somewhere “trendy”. It has been 3 years since I moved her to study. Since I came here, I somehow became conscious of my Japanese sensibility and until I came here I never considered myself a very ‘Japanesey Japanesey’ person. I now realise that my background is something to be appreciated, and its affected my work very much. It’s strange because I’m very conscious of being Japanese when I’m in Europe. I’m now trying to merge this with my new London life.
Coming from Japan, I was completely baffled by the idea of mounting a deers head and putting it on the wall. I’d never seen if before moving here, I thought it was really strange. With this piece (seen below), the head and body is divided by a very traditional looking floral bowl. I wanted to express peoples excessive desire to control nature and animals. I think it’s quite funny. In a way, this piece is a bit cynical.



On her daily life:
My average day is really boring. In the morning, I wake up to deal with emails and press over a cup of coffee. I then move onto working with my ceramics and just work work work! In the afternoon sometimes I visit an exhibition to see what’s going on and visit friends for tea and a catch up. In my free time, my favourite thing is to visit antique shops. I feel that time is visualised in that kind of shop. Looking at patterns on table tops or old lighting fixtures, my imagination never stops running. I can imagine the people and stories that have been created around each piece. Exploring the antique shops in very inspiring for me, I think it’s one of the biggest influences on my work. Kensington Church street has lots of great antique shops and what they have is also really precious, like porcelain figurines. It’s the most inspiring street in London for me.
On Alexander McQueen:
Last year I made porcelain pieces for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection. I’ve been working on my own for so long that collaborating with others is actually a really challenging thing to do. Time schedule-wise it was so tough but afterwards it cam out with such a fabulous dress that I was almost crying. It was a really great experience to work with someone and it made me learn that sometimes 1 + 1 can = 3. I had 3 and a half weeks to make almost a million tiny porcelain pieces and I can almost manage that but 5 days before the show the designers asked me to make some shoes as well. My average working time was 6am to 4am every day and afterwards I had to take a holiday. I went to Paris with friends for a few days. It’s strange, my whole memory from that time is almost gone.


On her work:
This flower teapot so far has been my best selling item. People really appreciate the fragility and delicacy of this piece. People like that you can see the craftsmanship behind it. The tradition and modernity existing together is what makes it work. This piece is not functional. It exists only as an interior art piece so I’m surprised that so many people choose it over a practical item.
The most enjoyable moment in the creation process is decorating my ceramics. I love excessive decoration and I’m using this new technique of adding gold onto the items which I adore. I feel it brings them to life. I love gold, colour and pattern, all together! When I put decoration on I feel like I’m breathing life into the pieces.
On design:
It’s tricky to define what good design is. To me I think designing products that inspires people and their lives is a good design. I feel like my slogan is to bring an element of fantasy into peoples daily life. I think art is not only in the museum. Art should be life. That’s why I decided to define the art and functional elements of my pieces. So people can enjoy the art and also use the product. I thought the ideal solution for my vision is to bring art into peoples daily life.

This week I visited ceramic artist Makiko Nakamura in her new studio at Clerkenwell. Coming from Japan and studying in London, her perspective is truly unique, so much so that she was hand picked to work alongside Sarah Burton on the Fall 2011 campaign for Alexander McQueen. We sat down on a drizzly English afternoon to talk about her career, being Japanese and of course, what it’s like working with Alexander McQueen.

On career:

I knew from a young age that I wanted to work in art. My grandmother gave me painting crayons when I was 3 and I’ve been expressing myself visually ever since. Then when I was 9 or 10 years old in primary school I remember picking up a plate. I thought ‘This is it!’ From that moment on I knew I wanted to work in ceramics. There’s no explanation for it, I just had a feeling.

On being Japanese in London:

To me, London is the main source of the inspiration for my collection. It’s the best city in the world for me. I’ve never been surrounded by such a group of talented, creative people. Old and new exist together in London – I can go to a great antique shop in the West and in the same day for drinks with my friends in the East, somewhere “trendy”. It has been 3 years since I moved her to study. Since I came here, I somehow became conscious of my Japanese sensibility and until I came here I never considered myself a very ‘Japanesey Japanesey’ person. I now realise that my background is something to be appreciated, and its affected my work very much. It’s strange because I’m very conscious of being Japanese when I’m in Europe. I’m now trying to merge this with my new London life.

Coming from Japan, I was completely baffled by the idea of mounting a deers head and putting it on the wall. I’d never seen if before moving here, I thought it was really strange. With this piece (seen below), the head and body is divided by a very traditional looking floral bowl. I wanted to express peoples excessive desire to control nature and animals. I think it’s quite funny. In a way, this piece is a bit cynical.

On her daily life:

My average day is really boring. In the morning, I wake up to deal with emails and press over a cup of coffee. I then move onto working with my ceramics and just work work work! In the afternoon sometimes I visit an exhibition to see what’s going on and visit friends for tea and a catch up. In my free time, my favourite thing is to visit antique shops. I feel that time is visualised in that kind of shop. Looking at patterns on table tops or old lighting fixtures, my imagination never stops running. I can imagine the people and stories that have been created around each piece. Exploring the antique shops in very inspiring for me, I think it’s one of the biggest influences on my work. Kensington Church street has lots of great antique shops and what they have is also really precious, like porcelain figurines. It’s the most inspiring street in London for me.

On Alexander McQueen:

Last year I made porcelain pieces for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection. I’ve been working on my own for so long that collaborating with others is actually a really challenging thing to do. Time schedule-wise it was so tough but afterwards it cam out with such a fabulous dress that I was almost crying. It was a really great experience to work with someone and it made me learn that sometimes 1 + 1 can = 3. I had 3 and a half weeks to make almost a million tiny porcelain pieces and I can almost manage that but 5 days before the show the designers asked me to make some shoes as well. My average working time was 6am to 4am every day and afterwards I had to take a holiday. I went to Paris with friends for a few days. It’s strange, my whole memory from that time is almost gone.

On her work:

This flower teapot so far has been my best selling item. People really appreciate the fragility and delicacy of this piece. People like that you can see the craftsmanship behind it. The tradition and modernity existing together is what makes it work. This piece is not functional. It exists only as an interior art piece so I’m surprised that so many people choose it over a practical item.

The most enjoyable moment in the creation process is decorating my ceramics. I love excessive decoration and I’m using this new technique of adding gold onto the items which I adore. I feel it brings them to life. I love gold, colour and pattern, all together! When I put decoration on I feel like I’m breathing life into the pieces.

On design:

It’s tricky to define what good design is. To me I think designing products that inspires people and their lives is a good design. I feel like my slogan is to bring an element of fantasy into peoples daily life. I think art is not only in the museum. Art should be life. That’s why I decided to define the art and functional elements of my pieces. So people can enjoy the art and also use the product. I thought the ideal solution for my vision is to bring art into peoples daily life.

Please! Magazine is one of those fashion journals which oozes style. With glossy editorials and considered articles, it’s pages are some of the most desirable in Paris. Now, you know us, we want you to have as much style in your life as possible. That’s why we’re offering you up to 20% off with a Bamarang subscription offer. You’re welcome.
http://www.bamarang.co.uk/please-magazine/

Please! Magazine is one of those fashion journals which oozes style. With glossy editorials and considered articles, it’s pages are some of the most desirable in Paris. Now, you know us, we want you to have as much style in your life as possible. That’s why we’re offering you up to 20% off with a Bamarang subscription offer. You’re welcome.

http://www.bamarang.co.uk/please-magazine/


This week we caught up with Design Scout, Katy. She told us about her biggest inspirations, her favourite things about London and where she discovers new talent.
On Design
I’ve worked in the industry for about 10 years now and over the decade managed to hone my skills into a focus on art. I studied illustration at university so visual art has always been a big passion of mine and I feel quite lucky that I’m able to do something I love.
Good design for me is something that’s quite instinctive. Even if I can’t quite put my finger on it, it’s shout out to me and I know that it’s ticked the right boxes. I tend to have a gut reaction and know I’ve discovered something good nearly instantly. The thing is, design touches every part of our lives and I truly believe that a life filled with art is a happier one. My walls at home are covered in work by people who inspire me. From prints of the ‘greats’, to emerging artists that I’ve discovered in my local area. One of my favourite artists right now is Karin Akesson, who sells her work in the Sunday market on Brick lane. She has a soft, feminine touch to her work which is gorgeous.
On Inspiration
I tend to find most of the artists we work with by attending gallery openings, reading industry-leading magazines like “Paper Runway”, which I also write for, and most importantly reading blogs. The explosion of blogging has really split the art world wide open as each artist has their own voice. You can get a great idea of the artist’s work just by seeing the images and descriptions on their blog.
On Bamarang
I really love Bamarang, and the concept behind the company. What’s so nice about it is, it’s exclusive. I’ve been a big fan of vintage shopping and with vintage you know you’re getting something unique. There’s a story behind the item and I won’t be walking away with a product that all of my friends will also own. I hope to bring a little bit of that to Bamarang. My main goal is to find someone unknown or rare work, and give it a platform.
On London
I’m wasn’t born and bred in London, but like to still think of myself as a Londoner. When I head back home to Hull, I always have to pack extra jumpers as I’ve acclimatised to those few extra degrees of heat. London is one of those places that just always has something going on. I can’t walk down any main road or side street without finding some street art, graffiti or market stall to inspire me. I love it and can’t imagine living anywhere else.  
Katy’s Favourite Things on Bamarang just now:

1. This Geisha Print is really bold. I love colour and think the combination of pink and green hues works really well. It’s got 30% off for this week on Bamarang so it’s a real steal!
2. As I said, Karin Akesson is a great designer. I love two of her products particularly. The black and white printed tote has messages explaining reasons why we shop…a little guilty pleasure I can relate to. It’s just over a tenner on Bamarang! The second is a print with romantic quotes - it’s Karin’s signature style and always makes me smile. Buy it on Bamarang here. 
3. This Tiger print box canvas reminds me of the graffiti I see on the walk to work. Raw but ultimately beautiful. It’s down to £34 on Bamarang now. 

This week we caught up with Design Scout, Katy. She told us about her biggest inspirations, her favourite things about London and where she discovers new talent.

On Design

I’ve worked in the industry for about 10 years now and over the decade managed to hone my skills into a focus on art. I studied illustration at university so visual art has always been a big passion of mine and I feel quite lucky that I’m able to do something I love.

Good design for me is something that’s quite instinctive. Even if I can’t quite put my finger on it, it’s shout out to me and I know that it’s ticked the right boxes. I tend to have a gut reaction and know I’ve discovered something good nearly instantly. The thing is, design touches every part of our lives and I truly believe that a life filled with art is a happier one. My walls at home are covered in work by people who inspire me. From prints of the ‘greats’, to emerging artists that I’ve discovered in my local area. One of my favourite artists right now is Karin Akesson, who sells her work in the Sunday market on Brick lane. She has a soft, feminine touch to her work which is gorgeous.

On Inspiration

I tend to find most of the artists we work with by attending gallery openings, reading industry-leading magazines like “Paper Runway”, which I also write for, and most importantly reading blogs. The explosion of blogging has really split the art world wide open as each artist has their own voice. You can get a great idea of the artist’s work just by seeing the images and descriptions on their blog.

On Bamarang

I really love Bamarang, and the concept behind the company. What’s so nice about it is, it’s exclusive. I’ve been a big fan of vintage shopping and with vintage you know you’re getting something unique. There’s a story behind the item and I won’t be walking away with a product that all of my friends will also own. I hope to bring a little bit of that to Bamarang. My main goal is to find someone unknown or rare work, and give it a platform.

On London

I’m wasn’t born and bred in London, but like to still think of myself as a Londoner. When I head back home to Hull, I always have to pack extra jumpers as I’ve acclimatised to those few extra degrees of heat. London is one of those places that just always has something going on. I can’t walk down any main road or side street without finding some street art, graffiti or market stall to inspire me. I love it and can’t imagine living anywhere else.  

Katy’s Favourite Things on Bamarang just now:

1. This Geisha Print is really bold. I love colour and think the combination of pink and green hues works really well. It’s got 30% off for this week on Bamarang so it’s a real steal!

2. As I said, Karin Akesson is a great designer. I love two of her products particularly. The black and white printed tote has messages explaining reasons why we shop…a little guilty pleasure I can relate to. It’s just over a tenner on Bamarang! The second is a print with romantic quotes - it’s Karin’s signature style and always makes me smile. Buy it on Bamarang here

3. This Tiger print box canvas reminds me of the graffiti I see on the walk to work. Raw but ultimately beautiful. It’s down to £34 on Bamarang now

We like to think we’re a team of healthy individuals at Bamarang (some more than others!) so when we got our hands on Karim Rashid’s new Bobble bottle, it was a happy day. 

The Bobble design has a built in water filtering system meaning soft, fresh refreshment on the go. They’re also made from recycled material and super-eco friendly. Yes please! 

Check out this amazing product by Californian-based Fydelity: Stereo bags. These are bags that contain built in speakers to connect to your MP3 player!

Milan Furniture Fair, Milano Salone, Salone Internazionale del Mobile…it can all only mean one thing. Milan Design Week is back.
Now that Spring is undeniably in the air, it’s time for all the buyers of the design world to head to Milan for mounds of inspiration, too many espressos and close-calls with death (the crazy traffic takes some getting used to).
This may be the first time Bamarang UK is representing at Milan Design Week but as most of our design scouts have been in the business for quite some time, they’re pro’s at navigating the paved streets. After what felt like the longest week since Christmas, Sam, Gui, Chiara and Maider have travelled over to the largest design fair of it’s kind in the world, and to say that they’re excited to discover something new is an understatement.
As a preview to this years activities, we decided to round up what we’re most excited about this year. Find our top 3 things to see below and remember to check our Twitter on @BamarangUK with updates throughout Milan Design Week.
The Moleskin Orchestra

The iconic notebook marker, decided to think outside the box for this years festival. Morphing stationary into instruments, they’ve taken pens, notebooks, erasers and even booklights to form machines of musical magnificence.
The design installation has been created by Felix Thorn, inventor of Felix’s Machines, and an expert in music and technology. If you’re in Milan, we recommend you head to La Rinascente to view “Hacked, 100 Hours of Rebel Creativity” to check out the creation.  
Marni Colomdian Chairs

Marni may have just stormed the high street with their fashion, but it’s the premier of their Columian chair’s that we’re most excited about. Woven from PVC threads and produced by ex-prisoners, their collection of 100 chairs will be shown in the Marni pop-up boutique with proceeds going to the institute ICAM of Milan – a project to allow children of imprisoned mothers to spend their youth in a family environment.
The Masters Retrospective
Historical group De Pas, D’Urbino and Lomazzi have created so many iconic items over the years, that the MINI & Triennale Creative Set are presenting a tribute to their work. Their contribution to Italian design is outstanding – from inventing the ‘Blow’ chair, the world’s first inflatable (and super-affordable) furniture to the ‘Joe’ leather baseball glove seat. Their designs are worth checking out, even just to give your imagination a jolt – see the exhibition now, curated by Vanni Pasca.

Milan Furniture Fair, Milano Salone, Salone Internazionale del Mobile…it can all only mean one thing. Milan Design Week is back.

Now that Spring is undeniably in the air, it’s time for all the buyers of the design world to head to Milan for mounds of inspiration, too many espressos and close-calls with death (the crazy traffic takes some getting used to).

This may be the first time Bamarang UK is representing at Milan Design Week but as most of our design scouts have been in the business for quite some time, they’re pro’s at navigating the paved streets. After what felt like the longest week since Christmas, Sam, Gui, Chiara and Maider have travelled over to the largest design fair of it’s kind in the world, and to say that they’re excited to discover something new is an understatement.

As a preview to this years activities, we decided to round up what we’re most excited about this year. Find our top 3 things to see below and remember to check our Twitter on @BamarangUK with updates throughout Milan Design Week.

The Moleskin Orchestra

The iconic notebook marker, decided to think outside the box for this years festival. Morphing stationary into instruments, they’ve taken pens, notebooks, erasers and even booklights to form machines of musical magnificence.

The design installation has been created by Felix Thorn, inventor of Felix’s Machines, and an expert in music and technology. If you’re in Milan, we recommend you head to La Rinascente to view “Hacked, 100 Hours of Rebel Creativity” to check out the creation.  

Marni Colomdian Chairs

Marni may have just stormed the high street with their fashion, but it’s the premier of their Columian chair’s that we’re most excited about. Woven from PVC threads and produced by ex-prisoners, their collection of 100 chairs will be shown in the Marni pop-up boutique with proceeds going to the institute ICAM of Milan – a project to allow children of imprisoned mothers to spend their youth in a family environment.

The Masters Retrospective

Historical group De Pas, D’Urbino and Lomazzi have created so many iconic items over the years, that the MINI & Triennale Creative Set are presenting a tribute to their work. Their contribution to Italian design is outstanding – from inventing the ‘Blow’ chair, the world’s first inflatable (and super-affordable) furniture to the ‘Joe’ leather baseball glove seat. Their designs are worth checking out, even just to give your imagination a jolt – see the exhibition now, curated by Vanni Pasca.


Swedish illustrator Karin Åkesson has been living in the UK since moving to Brighton to study Illustration. After transferring to London for her MA at the Royal College of Art in 2001, she fell in love with the city and decided to make it her home, now living and working as a freelance designer in East London.
When our design scout Katy discovered Karin at a local exhibition, she instantly knew her designs would fit perfectly with Bamarang. Despite being several hundred miles from her Swedish homeland, Karin’s work constantly refers to her Scandinavian roots. It’s the Swedish nature, and her take on flora and fauna that inspired us most, mixing nostalgia and warmth to her work.
We took a trip to Victoria Park Road in London where Karin is based, to have a look at her work, her process and have a natter about her biggest inspirations.




On her work:
“My best selling item is the bird pillow cases set with Tomorrow Something Wonderful Will Happen and ‘Tomorrow Will be a Great Day’ written on them. I think people tend to respond to that because everyone wants something wonderful to happen! I love the idea of waking up to something positive in your life.”
“One of my latest pieces which I love is a bag I created, inspired by excessive shopping. I covered it in my top excuses for taking another shopping trip, like ‘It was on sale’ or ‘I deserve to treat myself’. After a spending spree I needed something to make me feel a little better about my splurge. I often find that the small things in everyday time are what brings me most ideas for the work.”
On London:
“London is such an exciting place to live. I love the mixture of people and culture and I love how new independent shops, backyard markets and homemade cakes stall pop up everywhere you turn. Sweden is much more controlled and polished and for me a little bit too “perfect”. One of the things I love about going back to Sweden is going back to nature and outdoor life. I like to bring some elements of the natural life indoors into my work like drawings of birds and plants.”
“I moved near Victoria Park about 5 months ago and I adore the area, it’s absolutely amazing. The park is just next door, it almost feels like I’m home in Sweden because you can hear the birds. On top of that, you still have lots of small shops, the butcher, the fishmonger and little Pubs which are so cute. It feels like a small neighbourhood but is only a short distance from the centre of city life.”
“Every Sunday I have a stall at Sunday Up Market near Brick lane, it is a great way to get in contact with new customers and test out new products so if you are in the area pop by and say ‘Hi!’”



On her inspiration:
“My sketchbooks are filled with lists and words, I write down my ideas before I start to visualize them. Developing a strong idea has always been priority and then I move onto the next step where I turn it into something ‘pretty’.”
“I went through a phase of drawing a lot of birds and animals, and add a lot of nostalgia. I want people to see it and feel they can relate to it so I often add quotes from old films or common sayings. I want people to look at my work and maybe make them smile a bit.”
On her plans:
“I think it’s really important to support local business so I try to make everything close to home - it’s an ethic which is really important to me and something I plan to champion going forward. I use a printer in the East End and manufacture everything in the UK. That’s something I don’t ever want to compromise in my work.”
“One of my favourite things is a large wall hanging from Mairo a Swedish textile company. I love pattern and in the future I would love to develop a range of textiles to go beyond illustration.”
“Looking back it has been a quite bumpy road but I have kept pushing forward and enjoyed the journey. I’ve always been aware of how lucky I am. Being able to do my own thing is a real luxury and one I hope to retain for many years.”






Karin’s range of illustrative prints and textiles, transfer beautifully to items for everyday life: from cute tote bags to cheerful pillow cases…we want them all! The Karin Åkesson collection launches on Sunday in the Bamarang store. With only 7 days to get your hands on some goodies, you’d best get in there quick!

Swedish illustrator Karin Åkesson has been living in the UK since moving to Brighton to study Illustration. After transferring to London for her MA at the Royal College of Art in 2001, she fell in love with the city and decided to make it her home, now living and working as a freelance designer in East London.

When our design scout Katy discovered Karin at a local exhibition, she instantly knew her designs would fit perfectly with Bamarang. Despite being several hundred miles from her Swedish homeland, Karin’s work constantly refers to her Scandinavian roots. It’s the Swedish nature, and her take on flora and fauna that inspired us most, mixing nostalgia and warmth to her work.

We took a trip to Victoria Park Road in London where Karin is based, to have a look at her work, her process and have a natter about her biggest inspirations.

On her work:

“My best selling item is the bird pillow cases set with Tomorrow Something Wonderful Will Happen and ‘Tomorrow Will be a Great Day’ written on them. I think people tend to respond to that because everyone wants something wonderful to happen! I love the idea of waking up to something positive in your life.”

“One of my latest pieces which I love is a bag I created, inspired by excessive shopping. I covered it in my top excuses for taking another shopping trip, like ‘It was on sale’ or ‘I deserve to treat myself’. After a spending spree I needed something to make me feel a little better about my splurge. I often find that the small things in everyday time are what brings me most ideas for the work.”

On London:

“London is such an exciting place to live. I love the mixture of people and culture and I love how new independent shops, backyard markets and homemade cakes stall pop up everywhere you turn. Sweden is much more controlled and polished and for me a little bit too “perfect”. One of the things I love about going back to Sweden is going back to nature and outdoor life. I like to bring some elements of the natural life indoors into my work like drawings of birds and plants.”

“I moved near Victoria Park about 5 months ago and I adore the area, it’s absolutely amazing. The park is just next door, it almost feels like I’m home in Sweden because you can hear the birds. On top of that, you still have lots of small shops, the butcher, the fishmonger and little Pubs which are so cute. It feels like a small neighbourhood but is only a short distance from the centre of city life.”

“Every Sunday I have a stall at Sunday Up Market near Brick lane, it is a great way to get in contact with new customers and test out new products so if you are in the area pop by and say ‘Hi!’”

On her inspiration:

“My sketchbooks are filled with lists and words, I write down my ideas before I start to visualize them. Developing a strong idea has always been priority and then I move onto the next step where I turn it into something ‘pretty’.”

“I went through a phase of drawing a lot of birds and animals, and add a lot of nostalgia. I want people to see it and feel they can relate to it so I often add quotes from old films or common sayings. I want people to look at my work and maybe make them smile a bit.”

On her plans:

“I think it’s really important to support local business so I try to make everything close to home - it’s an ethic which is really important to me and something I plan to champion going forward. I use a printer in the East End and manufacture everything in the UK. That’s something I don’t ever want to compromise in my work.”

“One of my favourite things is a large wall hanging from Mairo a Swedish textile company. I love pattern and in the future I would love to develop a range of textiles to go beyond illustration.”

“Looking back it has been a quite bumpy road but I have kept pushing forward and enjoyed the journey. I’ve always been aware of how lucky I am. Being able to do my own thing is a real luxury and one I hope to retain for many years.”

Karin’s range of illustrative prints and textiles, transfer beautifully to items for everyday life: from cute tote bags to cheerful pillow cases…we want them all! The Karin Åkesson collection launches on Sunday in the Bamarang store. With only 7 days to get your hands on some goodies, you’d best get in there quick!

Coleman Coffee is on Bamarang this week and we couldn’t resist sampling some of Coleman’s finest. Our favourite? Santa Helena from Brazil!
We asked the team at Coleman to give us some insight into the making of the coffee.
"Fazenda Santa Helena sits 1200m in the mountainous region of Carmo de Minas in Brasil. It is from the same state as the previous Brasil, Fazenda Recreio. So it is not too dissimilar. The farm has been growing coffees for decades and since 1999 has been under the watchful eye of the Cameiro family.Since the farm was acquired, Jacques Cameiro has focused on the production of specialty coffees. Special care is taken, starting with the planting of the seedlings. Areas facing south or southwest are avoided because the cherries ripen more slowly and conditions are more propitious for the development of diseases.Harvesting, which takes place between May and October, is done 100% by hand and involves in three selective passes. Immediately afterwards the coffee is taken to a wet processing mill on the site. The natural coffee and the pulped cherries are pre-dried on a 7,000 square-meter patio and dried in mechanical dryers. All coffee lots are traceable and undergo rigorous quality control in order to achieve exceptional specialty coffees. The variety of coffee is yellow bourbon and undergoes a pulp-natural process.TASTING NOTES: Smooth. Medium to full body, Chocolate with a caramel sweetness. Ripe tropical fruit notes throughout.”

Coleman Coffee is on Bamarang this week and we couldn’t resist sampling some of Coleman’s finest. Our favourite? Santa Helena from Brazil!

We asked the team at Coleman to give us some insight into the making of the coffee.

"Fazenda Santa Helena sits 1200m in the mountainous region of Carmo de Minas in Brasil. It is from the same state as the previous Brasil, Fazenda Recreio. So it is not too dissimilar. The farm has been growing coffees for decades and since 1999 has been under the watchful eye of the Cameiro family.

Since the farm was acquired, Jacques Cameiro has focused on the production of specialty coffees. Special care is taken, starting with the planting of the seedlings. Areas facing south or southwest are avoided because the cherries ripen more slowly and conditions are more propitious for the development of diseases.

Harvesting, which takes place between May and October, is done 100% by hand and involves in three selective passes. Immediately afterwards the coffee is taken to a wet processing mill on the site. The natural coffee and the pulped cherries are pre-dried on a 7,000 square-meter patio and dried in mechanical dryers. All coffee lots are traceable and undergo rigorous quality control in order to achieve exceptional specialty coffees. The variety of coffee is yellow bourbon and undergoes a pulp-natural process.

TASTING NOTES: Smooth. Medium to full body, Chocolate with a caramel sweetness. Ripe tropical fruit notes throughout.”

Davidelfin is one of the most exciting designers we’re working with right now. The Spanish designer is making huge waves in the fashion world with his technical skill and creative use of colour, and it’s the mustard yellow item that we’re eyeing up this Spring.  We managed to get our hands on the key pieces which look so rich they’re practically edible. 
David Elfin, creative director, says “I came to the fashion through painting. In 1999, after several individual and collective exhibition…I decided to use military clothes second hand as support. There was a memory, a fingerprint. Names of the people that inhabited them, grease, stains, stitching…everything revolved around thinking, life.”
"The editors of fashion and some emerging pathways were interested in my work and although this was not the goal, I ended up accepting demand and I discovered a fascinating environment where to translate my concerns. I felt I had found my place as if it were unknown knowledge."
"In 2001, the Davidelfin brand was created by Bimba Bose, Deborah Postigo, Gorka Postigo, Diego Postigo and me. It all started as a plural medium where to express our needs, involving fashion, photographym, architecture and video. Since September 2002, we present our collections in Cibeles Madrid Fashion Week and since February 2009 at New York Fashion Week."
"Emotions remain the motor of my work. Everything for doing, everything for giving."
David is a true creative talent in the commercial world of fashion, and we can’t get enough. To see the whole collection, click here.

Suede Mustard Yellow Bag - down from £270 to £130!
Quote adapted from Davidelfin.com

Davidelfin is one of the most exciting designers we’re working with right now. The Spanish designer is making huge waves in the fashion world with his technical skill and creative use of colour, and it’s the mustard yellow item that we’re eyeing up this Spring.  We managed to get our hands on the key pieces which look so rich they’re practically edible. 

David Elfin, creative director, says “I came to the fashion through painting. In 1999, after several individual and collective exhibition…I decided to use military clothes second hand as support. There was a memory, a fingerprint. Names of the people that inhabited them, grease, stains, stitching…everything revolved around thinking, life.”

"The editors of fashion and some emerging pathways were interested in my work and although this was not the goal, I ended up accepting demand and I discovered a fascinating environment where to translate my concerns. I felt I had found my place as if it were unknown knowledge."

"In 2001, the Davidelfin brand was created by Bimba Bose, Deborah Postigo, Gorka Postigo, Diego Postigo and me. It all started as a plural medium where to express our needs, involving fashion, photographym, architecture and video. Since September 2002, we present our collections in Cibeles Madrid Fashion Week and since February 2009 at New York Fashion Week."

"Emotions remain the motor of my work. Everything for doing, everything for giving."

David is a true creative talent in the commercial world of fashion, and we can’t get enough. To see the whole collection, click here.

Suede Mustard Yellow Bag - down from £270 to £130!

Quote adapted from Davidelfin.com

As we’re all about championing new design talent, it would be silly of us not to look within our own talented team for inspiration. Chiara Bello, our expert Design Scout, is also an expert jewellery designer! After wearing some of her designs to the office, we couldn’t wait to offer them on the site to our Bamarang fans and managed to get the full selection of Chic Pig jewellery.
"I’ve always loved sketching animals and illustrating fun characters, so after a while I thought ‘why not join that with my design skills?’ Chic Pig is the ultimate mash-up for me - I wanted to create a funny but ultimately chic collection of jewellery that would bring a sense of humour and colour to everyday life!"

"I decided to create a whole life for each of my farm yard animals - making names and life stories for each. Every time I wear one of the collection I always get a compliment and when the team at Bamarang saw, they went wild! I was very flattered"
We always knew Chiara has an overactive imagination, and Chic Pig is the crazy-cool product of that…we’re glad she’s putting it to good use. Not only do they look great, but they’re also superb quality too. All the designs are hand crafted using traditional enamelling techniques in Chiara’s home town in Italy.
We’ve got the whole Chic Pig collection, and you can check them out here.

As we’re all about championing new design talent, it would be silly of us not to look within our own talented team for inspiration. Chiara Bello, our expert Design Scout, is also an expert jewellery designer! After wearing some of her designs to the office, we couldn’t wait to offer them on the site to our Bamarang fans and managed to get the full selection of Chic Pig jewellery.

"I’ve always loved sketching animals and illustrating fun characters, so after a while I thought ‘why not join that with my design skills?’ Chic Pig is the ultimate mash-up for me - I wanted to create a funny but ultimately chic collection of jewellery that would bring a sense of humour and colour to everyday life!"

"I decided to create a whole life for each of my farm yard animals - making names and life stories for each. Every time I wear one of the collection I always get a compliment and when the team at Bamarang saw, they went wild! I was very flattered"

We always knew Chiara has an overactive imagination, and Chic Pig is the crazy-cool product of that…we’re glad she’s putting it to good use. Not only do they look great, but they’re also superb quality too. All the designs are hand crafted using traditional enamelling techniques in Chiara’s home town in Italy.

We’ve got the whole Chic Pig collection, and you can check them out here.

At Bamarang, we’re always excited to support local talent - especially when they’re based in our neighbourhood! Faizal Lulat is a rising star in the East London art scene as he explored dynamic juxtapositions of his Indian heritage and secular urban life. 
We can’t resist his urban photographic prints, which mix rich colour with stark imagery. All the prints on offer are limited edition and signed by the artist himself - check out the range here.
Luckily, we managed to catch up with Faizal and find out a little bit about what makes him tick. 
"Encouraged to be creative early on, I’ve dabbled in Fine Art, Fashion, Typography, Photography and Design. With an eclectic mix of mediums at hand my work is still very much experi.man.tal.
Inspiration is from the everyday; very rarely will I be seen without camera in tow or a notepad in hand. As the photography is taken on my phone and the ideas are developed in my notepad, my work is a response to the surroundings we live in and the questions we ask ourselves. The journey is a personal one that dictates its own course, as everything is predestined and it is for us to search for the beauty and meanings of it all.”

How and when did you first become interested in art, photography and design?

As far back as I can remember I’ve been making things and when it came to doing it academically it just felt natural to follow a creative path. As time went on I just became more and more immersed in it all to the point where at A-levels I went from studying Fine Art, English and Geography to Fine Art, Graphic Design and 3D- Design.

How difficult has it been for you to establish yourself as an artist / photographer?

Fairly difficult, not so much from the point of view of being recognized by others but more understanding who I am. Calling myself an Artist has only taken shape in the last two years as before this time I was unsure of how to put the creativity into a meaningful purpose.

How would you describe your creative process? What is the very start of the process for you? A photograph, an idea, a location etc.?

I would say my creative process is constant. From the ever-changing faces of nature that surround us, to snippets of information found in the everyday. It all adds together in the melting pot of the being to formulate ideas that later become a part of you, which in turn become pieces of work.

Please could you describe your working space, to give us a sense of where and how you work?

My workspace is my room, which is nothing bigger than a box. The space might be tight but I have a mind that is free and a view over London to exercise it. The space is clean, organized and controlled to the point of having everything at right angles to one another before leaving the house.

How do you know when a piece is complete?

When I can sit back and look at it uninterrupted by the nagging feeling that something is not quite right.

What tool or medium could you not live without?

My notepad (and pen).

Who, or what, would you say has been your biggest inspirations for your work?

I’d have to say my mother and father, for achieving so much with so little.

How does your location and background influence your work?

Without being brought up in East London or being of a Muslim Indian background my work would be of a completely different nature. Both of the above have deep imprints on our being, as it is through our early years that we absorb so much of who we are to become. It is through the rich cultural influences that I am surrounded by and strict religious teaching I was brought up in, that I am able to ask diverse questions within a stable model.

What kind of art or design do you adorn your own home with? Any particular favourites, collections or obsessions?

I’ve started collecting a few pieces of work from local creative’s who I’ve come across. Although they haven’t made it to the walls yet as the space is not mine but as soon as I do each shall have their place.

Your perfect kind of breakfast?
I do love a good fry up, although it might be a while till I can chow down one of them. Just started going to the gym, healthy heart-healthy mind.

At Bamarang, we’re always excited to support local talent - especially when they’re based in our neighbourhood! Faizal Lulat is a rising star in the East London art scene as he explored dynamic juxtapositions of his Indian heritage and secular urban life. 

We can’t resist his urban photographic prints, which mix rich colour with stark imagery. All the prints on offer are limited edition and signed by the artist himself - check out the range here.

Luckily, we managed to catch up with Faizal and find out a little bit about what makes him tick. 

"Encouraged to be creative early on, I’ve dabbled in Fine Art, Fashion, Typography, Photography and Design. With an eclectic mix of mediums at hand my work is still very much experi.man.tal.

Inspiration is from the everyday; very rarely will I be seen without camera in tow or a notepad in hand. As the photography is taken on my phone and the ideas are developed in my notepad, my work is a response to the surroundings we live in and the questions we ask ourselves. The journey is a personal one that dictates its own course, as everything is predestined and it is for us to search for the beauty and meanings of it all.”

  1. How and when did you first become interested in art, photography and design?

As far back as I can remember I’ve been making things and when it came to doing it academically it just felt natural to follow a creative path. As time went on I just became more and more immersed in it all to the point where at A-levels I went from studying Fine Art, English and Geography to Fine Art, Graphic Design and 3D- Design.

  1. How difficult has it been for you to establish yourself as an artist / photographer?

Fairly difficult, not so much from the point of view of being recognized by others but more understanding who I am. Calling myself an Artist has only taken shape in the last two years as before this time I was unsure of how to put the creativity into a meaningful purpose.

  1. How would you describe your creative process? What is the very start of the process for you? A photograph, an idea, a location etc.?

I would say my creative process is constant. From the ever-changing faces of nature that surround us, to snippets of information found in the everyday. It all adds together in the melting pot of the being to formulate ideas that later become a part of you, which in turn become pieces of work.

  1. Please could you describe your working space, to give us a sense of where and how you work?

My workspace is my room, which is nothing bigger than a box. The space might be tight but I have a mind that is free and a view over London to exercise it. The space is clean, organized and controlled to the point of having everything at right angles to one another before leaving the house.

  1. How do you know when a piece is complete?

When I can sit back and look at it uninterrupted by the nagging feeling that something is not quite right.

  1. What tool or medium could you not live without?

My notepad (and pen).

  1. Who, or what, would you say has been your biggest inspirations for your work?

I’d have to say my mother and father, for achieving so much with so little.

  1. How does your location and background influence your work?

Without being brought up in East London or being of a Muslim Indian background my work would be of a completely different nature. Both of the above have deep imprints on our being, as it is through our early years that we absorb so much of who we are to become. It is through the rich cultural influences that I am surrounded by and strict religious teaching I was brought up in, that I am able to ask diverse questions within a stable model.

  1. What kind of art or design do you adorn your own home with? Any particular favourites, collections or obsessions?

I’ve started collecting a few pieces of work from local creative’s who I’ve come across. Although they haven’t made it to the walls yet as the space is not mine but as soon as I do each shall have their place.

  1. Your perfect kind of breakfast?

    I do love a good fry up, although it might be a while till I can chow down one of them. Just started going to the gym, healthy heart-healthy mind.

Our latest addition, Kozo lamps are upcycled from metal pipes! Check out the range here.